Portfolio Work

Over the weekend, I did a couple of little mini shoots to create some semblance of a portfolio. I would like to have something to show anyone that asks about my photography. Once I get this first wedding under my belt, I’d like to start volunteering my time to local wedding photographers as a second shooter, if they’ll have me, and I’d like to have a small portfolio and business cards ready for that. Today I purchased a domain name where I’ll host this blog so it’ll look a little more professional, so I’ll be creating new business cards soon and I’ll put that address on my business cards. Here are a few shots from this weekend’s shoot:


Workflow

This one baby step in my *possible* photography career has me thinking about my workflow, future marketing strategies, etc. It’s just a tiny step forward – YEARS before I expected it to happen – and it has me researching/planning for the future (can you tell I’m a planner?). My current workflow is not very efficient, which leaves me with still half of my photos not backed up (I’ve been working on correcting that this week), me at the computer until the wee hours in Photoshop, and a definite need for a better strategy. So hear goes nothing…

In Camera
I currently am shooting RAW only, but for this upcoming wedding I’ll be shooting RAW+JPEG and may be switching to that for everything. I love the control I have over the exposure, white balance, etc. in RAW files. I would like to eventually get better at perfecting the images in-camera as possible, but for now I’ll tweak it during processing when the need arises. The reason I think I’ll start shooting +JPEG also is for ease of viewing once I get the photos in the computer, and I end up converting to JPEG before I’m done anyway. I shoot almost entirely in Manual mode because I think it is helps me learn how the different settings work together.

Organization
When I get done shooting, I use the card reader on my computer to transfer the files over (thank goodness for HP and the built-in card readers – no more draining camera batteries!). I currently don’t back up at this stage – and this is one thing I plan to change pronto! My issue with this is that most of my “shoots” now don’t consist of very many shots at a time and I hate to waste CD/DVD space. I really shouldn’t upload to the computer until I have enough to fill a CD/DVD…or start using CD/DVD-RWs. (Is there anyone out there reading my nonsense that would like to give some feedback on how you back-up?) I load the RAW/JPEG files into a folder by date (2007 01 15) and in that folder I create a new folder called TIFFs. In the future I’ll be backing up the RAW/JPEG files to a CD twice (one for storage at home, the other I take to our lock box at the bank – even my personal shots I don’t want to lose). I’ll eventually need a larger-format back-up system, but for right now this is what I’m using. After post-processing I batch process the edited JPEGs to create TIFFs (with “TIFF” at the end of the filename) and they are put in the TIFF folder. The batch process is done in Photoshop Elements 6.0 (hopefully soon I’ll be able to update to full-blown Photoshop but for now, Elements is still doing what I need), as is my post processing after I’ve edited the RAW files in Photoshop’s RAW editor. I really need to start using some sort of rating system, as now it’s taking me forever to sort through all of the images and I end up editing all of them.

Post Processing
I do my RAW editing in Photoshop’s RAW editor, but I’d also like to look into the CaptureONE software that I got for free with the last SanDisk CF card I purchased. One of my issues now is sorting through all of my files to delete the really bad shots, and I have to open them individually in the RAW editor to do that, or shoot and upload RAW+JPEG and use a slideshow to view the JPEGs, then go back to the folder and delete the files that are really bad (out of focus, etc). I think CaptureONE may solve this problem by allowing me to flip through my RAW files quickly. I do all of my white balance, saturation, and contrast adjustments in the RAW editor. Then I open Photoshop and do any straightening or cropping and almost always do a little sharpening. I also add any special effects. I ALWAYS start by duplicating the layer and doing any changes on the duplicated layer, and sometimes I do a layer for each change. Depending on the changes I make, sometimes I flatten the image and save as a high quality JPEG, or keep it as a PSD. When I’m done editing I run a batch process in Elements to save copies of all edited files as TIFF files in my TIFF folder. I like to keep my TIFFs separate so I don’t have to sort through them when trying to upload pictures to websites, etc.

That’s it! It’s still not very efficient, but I’m working on it!

Loves*
NN

Workflow

This one baby step in my *possible* photography career has me thinking about my workflow, future marketing strategies, etc. It’s just a tiny step forward – YEARS before I expected it to happen – and it has me researching/planning for the future (can you tell I’m a planner?). My current workflow is not very efficient, which leaves me with still half of my photos not backed up (I’ve been working on correcting that this week), me at the computer until the wee hours in Photoshop, and a definite need for a better strategy. So hear goes nothing…

In Camera
I currently am shooting RAW only, but for this upcoming wedding I’ll be shooting RAW+JPEG and may be switching to that for everything. I love the control I have over the exposure, white balance, etc. in RAW files. I would like to eventually get better at perfecting the images in-camera as possible, but for now I’ll tweak it during processing when the need arises. The reason I think I’ll start shooting +JPEG also is for ease of viewing once I get the photos in the computer, and I end up converting to JPEG before I’m done anyway. I shoot almost entirely in Manual mode because I think it is helps me learn how the different settings work together.

Organization
When I get done shooting, I use the card reader on my computer to transfer the files over (thank goodness for HP and the built-in card readers – no more draining camera batteries!). I currently don’t back up at this stage – and this is one thing I plan to change pronto! My issue with this is that most of my “shoots” now don’t consist of very many shots at a time and I hate to waste CD/DVD space. I really shouldn’t upload to the computer until I have enough to fill a CD/DVD…or start using CD/DVD-RWs. (Is there anyone out there reading my nonsense that would like to give some feedback on how you back-up?) I load the RAW/JPEG files into a folder by date (2007 01 15) and in that folder I create a new folder called TIFFs. In the future I’ll be backing up the RAW/JPEG files to a CD twice (one for storage at home, the other I take to our lock box at the bank – even my personal shots I don’t want to lose). I’ll eventually need a larger-format back-up system, but for right now this is what I’m using. After post-processing I batch process the edited JPEGs to create TIFFs (with “TIFF” at the end of the filename) and they are put in the TIFF folder. The batch process is done in Photoshop Elements 6.0 (hopefully soon I’ll be able to update to full-blown Photoshop but for now, Elements is still doing what I need), as is my post processing after I’ve edited the RAW files in Photoshop’s RAW editor. I really need to start using some sort of rating system, as now it’s taking me forever to sort through all of the images and I end up editing all of them.

Post Processing
I do my RAW editing in Photoshop’s RAW editor, but I’d also like to look into the CaptureONE software that I got for free with the last SanDisk CF card I purchased. One of my issues now is sorting through all of my files to delete the really bad shots, and I have to open them individually in the RAW editor to do that, or shoot and upload RAW+JPEG and use a slideshow to view the JPEGs, then go back to the folder and delete the files that are really bad (out of focus, etc). I think CaptureONE may solve this problem by allowing me to flip through my RAW files quickly. I do all of my white balance, saturation, and contrast adjustments in the RAW editor. Then I open Photoshop and do any straightening or cropping and almost always do a little sharpening. I also add any special effects. I ALWAYS start by duplicating the layer and doing any changes on the duplicated layer, and sometimes I do a layer for each change. Depending on the changes I make, sometimes I flatten the image and save as a high quality JPEG, or keep it as a PSD. When I’m done editing I run a batch process in Elements to save copies of all edited files as TIFF files in my TIFF folder. I like to keep my TIFFs separate so I don’t have to sort through them when trying to upload pictures to websites, etc.

That’s it! It’s still not very efficient, but I’m working on it!

Loves*
NN

So, here goes nothing!

The incessant ramblings of an amateur photographer trying to learn her way around the digital photography world. I’ll be posting pictures as well as any information I gather that I think may help someone else in my position and basically rambling about anything I find interesting. Hopefully someone will find my information interesting as well as maybe give me some critique if they happen to stumble upon this blog and find any of my photos worth looking at.

For now, I’ll start with a list of the equipment I’m working with:

Canon Digital Rebel XT
18-55mm Kit Lens
Photoshop Elements 6.0

I’m thinking about buying a zoom lens with IS (image stabilizer) as I’m not much of a fan of tripods and a lot of my photography is travel photography. I’m usually sightseeing = no tripod.

More later,
NN

So, here goes nothing!

The incessant ramblings of an amateur photographer trying to learn her way around the digital photography world. I’ll be posting pictures as well as any information I gather that I think may help someone else in my position and basically rambling about anything I find interesting. Hopefully someone will find my information interesting as well as maybe give me some critique if they happen to stumble upon this blog and find any of my photos worth looking at.

For now, I’ll start with a list of the equipment I’m working with:

Canon Digital Rebel XT
18-55mm Kit Lens
Photoshop Elements 6.0

I’m thinking about buying a zoom lens with IS (image stabilizer) as I’m not much of a fan of tripods and a lot of my photography is travel photography. I’m usually sightseeing = no tripod.

More later,
NN